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laws. in fact, the u.s. attorney's office for the northern district of illinois, only 25 federal firearms cases were brought to that office in 2011. only 1% of the people, 62 out of over 4000 were denied guns based on background checks are prosecuted for illegally attempting to acquire firearms. that is too low of a rate. see what can be done by enforcing the law on the books before enforcing new ones. we will legislate in an area that deals with the issue of reporting to the database for the people who are not in there now. make sure that we deal with the mental health issues that are involved with the tragedies that we are talking about today and a lot of other tragedies that have happened. thank you. >> thank you, senator. will the witnesses please stand? affirm the oath as i complete the reading. do you affirm that the testimony you are about to give before the committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you god? >> i do. >> thank you. i will introduce the two witnesses from this panel. the first is john walsh, u.s. attorney. he has served
not as of yet. >> u.s. your republican colleagues on the committee to join you, buy or -- you have asked your republican colleagues on the committee to join you -- why or why not? [inaudible] >> first of all, i did not ask members to join me because i am not advancing legislation here. it is not like i will call them up to be a co-sponsor, there is nothing here to co-sponsor. in fact i made very clear as we were drafting its that i did not want to have the specific legislation in here. when we first started off my critical minerals bill was in here, which i usually supported, but this is -- if this is really a conversation starter, let's allow it to be just that. there is nothing predetermine, preordained, nothing determined in there. what i wanted to do was developing these discrete pieces of legislation where i go to my colleagues and ask for their specific support and i hope that they will take a look at it and there will be initiatives that will look at and say -- hey, coming from this perspective, i have this idea and maybe we can build a bill together. how can we make things happen? tha
to go. >> any member of al qaeda, a u.s. citizen or not, needs to know they have the ability to surrender anytime, anywhere throughout the world, and they can do so before their organization is to strike. we will destroy that organization, and u.s. citizens can surrender anytime. >> just on that point, i do not take a back seat to anybody in terms of citing al qaeda. i asked you a different question, and on the question of what kind of evidence ought to be applied, whether there ought to be geographic limits, the question of whether an individual should be allowed to surrender. for example, there is a question of whether the obligation changes, a valid target has not been publicly reported, so there are issues here, and i think we are going to have to continue discussions, and, madam, i look forward to the extra round. >> senator coats. >> i think it may be better held for further discussion next week in the classified room, but this whole idea of leaks, nothing upsets me more in this committee, and we have had a lot of these in the last few years, to see something that was d
the record show that the witness answered in the affirmative. we are pleased to be joined by u.s. attorney timothy heaphy. there was a request by the republican side it to send a witness to our next hearing on the importance of enforcement of the gun law. timothy heaphy was appointed as u.s. attorney for the western district of virginia. he has worked in private practice and taught at the university of virginia school law. mr. heaphy, thank you for joining us today. we will give you five minutes for an opening statement. your complete statement will be part of the record. and then we will ask you questions. >> thank you chairman durbin, ranking member cruz. i am pleased and honored to speak with you about the continuing work of the united states attorney community and the department of justice to address gun-related violence. this is a very personal issue to me. i've prosecuted hundreds of gun cases in my years as a federal prosecutor, including a yearlong trial of a violent drug gang right here in washington, d.c. i currently serve as united states attorney and a district that has felt th
, that the u.s. patent office issued a patent. i will not give you a pop quiz. it was labeled john deere plow. the implement sketched out could have easily been labeled one of the most important inventions in history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast iron with smooth innovation, it opened up swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for my hometown to exist. beforehand, tilling an acre took a full 24 hours. afterward, as little as five. every toil ended another assumption of what the land could produce. it is not just the start of agricultural success, but of national success. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead and increase harvest and feed the whole world. sometimes these innovations come from the most advanced science. other times they are simple steps and ideas that come from looking at and listening closely to the problem. all of them can break down barriers to food security. it can allow us to allow new paths of progress. we need those new pathways forward. take a look at a few recent headlines. "drough
over the next two years, all of our 66,000 u.s. troops currently in afghanistan -- we are leaving that country. for afghanistan that means there is going to be some significant shortfalls in combat capability. they are relying on the united states for all kinds of things. not only up until recently for being the primary fighting mechanism for the afghans, but also from a logistical standpoint and from an intelligence standpoint, we provide the bulk of support. that also includes air lifting for their troops to get a point of conflict where they need to engage with the enemy. host: as far as picking up after we leave? caller: they are not completely prepared. they have the afghan national come -- the afghan national police that is getting pretty good at their primary task of going after caliban cells. the other problem of this is an uneven prepared this. there are significant problems with training the afghan army. there are significant problems with training the afghan police. there is going to be some significant drawbacks to the drawdown announced by the president. host: "the ne
of the proudest times in my years in the u.s. senate is when a former vietnam friend spent a little time. . i was proud of the g.i. bill because we were able to get to world war ii veterans, jim webb and chuck hagel, we got together and we got the boat and passed the bill. that is the way things should work or this country. the objective was not to get jim webb or chuck hagel any credit. the inductive was to do something for the country, -- the objective was to do something for the country on the do something for the people. this kind of attention, this kind of recognition -- much of my life has been about doing everything i can in some way to help veterans and their families, whether it was a program or whatever it was. i'm proud of that. i'm more proud of that than anything else i have been involved in. i'm proud of my background and my career, like all of you are. nothing makes me prouder or has ever made me prouder. to each of you in this room, as of you who are watching this around the world, i say to you, thank you. thank you to you for your service and sacrifices. i will do everything
atannable nor desirable. host: one of the headlines this morning, january jobs again in u.s., or jobs gained rather in the u.s., 157,000. we go to pete in lakeland, florida on our line for democrats. you're on the "washington journal." caller: hey, top of the morning to you gentlemen. i know you touched a little bit on downsizing. i mean the microsoft, excel format, making everybody a number for efficiency in the efficiency experts. but man, i think capitalisms on the way to die in the united states. you got companies right now that, if you want your high tech workers and you want a submarine, the college students and the current working class in america, you go to india and you bring them over on visas. you want to crush the white collar workers, i mean unions as far as industrial are pretty much dead. you move your plants to china and mexico. host: patrick rice, your response to what he had to say. guest: if he's arguing we're on the brink of a social revolution, it would seem to me that, i can't see in the future and i don't want to say he's wrong, but we've been endured tougher economic
to people from silicon valley, from start-ups that have tried to hire here in the u.s., but could not find the talent. they found the talent in belarus and cannot bring the workers here because they cannot get the visas. they have workers that are working in belarus that they would like to bring here, but they cannot. host: we have one more student ready to talk to megan hughes. jerilyn joran does now. -- caroline joins us now. >> what is the impact you expect from gun legislation, given the fact that there are a large number of assault style weapons grandfather being. guest: i leave your speaking as a bit about the assault weapons ban, correct? >> correct. guest: the 1994 assault weapons ban, there were many questions about its web -- its effectiveness. senator dianne feinstein work on this in 1994. she is the main push, the maine senator pushing this today. -- the main senator pushing this today. the real question is whether it stands a chance. you have heard the president speaking about assault weapons bans as the booklet. you want -- specifically. he wants to see a boat propeller -- a
budget cuts a. u.s. general odierno talks about potential budget shortfalls. he talked about the sequester cuts that would go into effect next month and the temporary solution to fund the government did it will impact the size and readiness of the u.s. army forces. he made his remarks at the brookings institution. this is over an hour. >> good morning, everyone, and on behalf of brookings and our center for 21st century security, we're honored to have the chief of staff of the army, general ray odierno, to speak. you are aware of the challenges of the budget process and our future military planning as well as current operations. no one could be more distinguished and a more thoughtful person to discuss these matters than general odierno, who is a friend of brookings and the broader defense community for a long time, and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and defense throughout that time. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operation, directed its operations in the first year of the iraq war. then he returned as the mult
and facebook posts. >> u.s. chamber of commerce ceo tom donahue on the economy and deficit reduction. he talked about immigration reform and the role of the private sector in promoting economic growth. the manhattan institute is the host of this hour-long program. >> president of the manhattan institute, it is my honor to introduce tom donohue, president of the u.s. chamber of commerce. [applause] it was in 1997 that tom donohue became president and ceo of the u.s. chamber, and he has built the chamber into an unparalleled lobbying and political powerhouse. has quadrupled the chambers' budget and added hundreds of thousands of new members during his tenure, policy experts and legal advocates have helped influence regulatory agencies and politics and in the court of public opinion and governments around the world. one of his credibility is is the neck to identify key issues will ahead of the curve. he has aggressively against american jobs and growth agenda, a plan that -- advance the american jobs and growth agenda, a plan that includes rebuilding infrastructure, combating an avalanche of new r
effort, and i think this should be extended, not just to immigrants who are educated in the u.s., but highly skilled immigrants from other countries. >> lawyers as well? >> some lawyers. he is a lawyer two times over, and i think the u.s. is better by having him here. bigger and better reform for skilled immigrants, not just for stem but other highly skilled immigrants, which is being contemplated by separate senate bill going forward that would increase visa's for highly skilled workers. it is up about 215,000 from the present limit. both bills, i think should go beyond that, and make large numbers of easily obtainable and plymouth-based green cards available for for an educated workers who pass security and health checks, allowing portability for the visa and allowing -- and diminishing the role of foreign sponsorship going forward. the blueprint says that once a guest worker program that works, but also supports increased regulations for visas. the problem is the current visa programs for lower skilled workers, especially farm workers, are so over-regulated that farmers refus
. speaker, this is no time to eliminate preclearance. i'm reminded of a letter i wrote to the u.s. attorney's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-autho
to be joined by u.s. attorney tenness timothy h. there was a request by the republican side it to send a witness to our next hearing on the importance of enforcement of the gun law. timothy heaphy was appointed as u.s. attorney for the western district of virginia. he has worked in private practice and taught at the university of virginia school law. mr. heaphy, thank you for joining us today. we will give you five minutes for an opening statement. your complete dimon will be part of the record. and then we will ask you questions. >> thank you chairman durbin, ranking member cruz. i am pleased and honored to speak with you about the continuing work of the united states attorney community and the department of justice to address non-related violence. this is a very person -- to address a gun-related violence. this is a very personal issue to me. i've prosecuted hundreds of gun cases in my years as a federal prosecutor, including a yearlong trial of a violent drug gang right here in washington, d.c. akron to serve as united states attorney in a district that has felt the pain -- i curren
the u.s. congress, both of the house and the senate, needs to do is to repeal the national war powers act, which was never repealed after world war ii. this is what has given the president the power of executive power. the gentleman from missouri, i am with you that the repeal of the 17th amendment needs to be done. also, your caller from new hampshire, he was right on with the 10th amendment. executive orders by the president are a president's hope, a president's win and a desire. it really is not law unless it is backed by the courts. again, other people have mentioned that the courts have told the president that he needs to remove these people from that board. those were illegal appointments. he yet flaunts the supreme court. where do we stop with the executive orders? host: on the news makers this week, harold rogers is our guest. he talks about the sequester and what congress is not reaching an agreement on spending cuts. let's take a listen to him talk about whether the sequestered as any flexibility. is there any way they can decide how the cuts are put into place. [video clip]
that purchasers who procure weapons for criminals can be prosecuted more effectively. last thursday, the u.s. attorney for minnesota was nominated and we have two from his state on this committee. he nominated the u.s. attorney to direct the committee. we will join a good faith to strengthen our law enforcement against gun violence and to protect public safety. as a responsible governor and someone who cherishes all of our constitutional rights, as a senator who has sworn an oath to uphold those rights, as a father and grandfather, and as a former prosecutor who has seen the results of gun violence firsthand in graphic detail, undertake these efforts in the hope that this hearing can build consensus around common sense solutions. previous measures to close gun show loopholes or to improve the background check system have been bypassed. i hope in this new congress, further improvements will also become bipartisan. we could act together as americans. i have said what kind of measures i can propose. i will ask other senators to come forward and do as well. i will ask our witnesses what legislat
by a u.s. president. he spoke about gun laws, new spending on education, increasing the minimum wage, creating new private-sector- public partnerships. there was a response from marco rubio and another from rand paul. we will get your reaction to all of this. 202-585-3882 for all others. reach us on twitter or facebook, or send us an e-mail. let's go through the headlines in the national papers this morning. pierce "usa toda -- here is "usa today" -- and then here is the "washington times" -- and the new york times -- the wall street journal -- the washington post -- we are getting your reaction this morning on the washington journal for the first hour. what did you think of the speech, the proposals, and the republican response as well? later on, a line of lawmakers for their reaction and to take your comments. our first phone call is joe in georgia, republican. caller: thank you. i love c-span, greta. it was the same old obama with more taxes and more government. marco rubio is incredible. the key to our future is electing more people like him and tom graves and doug collins and to
and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an incident that has just occurred and i don't want to get ahead of it, is being investigated. we strongly condemn what was a suicide attack against our embassy in ankara, which took place at the embassy's our security perimeter. details are still emerging about what exactly happened, who was responsible. it is clearly an act of terror. it caused -- cost hte life about least one individual, a turkish security guard. we are working with the turkish authorities to investigate the incident and bring the perpetrators to justice. our thoughts and prayers
of the u.s. capitol the sunday. the nation's governors continue their winter meeting on sunday. congress returns tomorrow with the senate. chuck hagel is expected to be the next defense secretary. a boat could happen early as tuesday. and those automatic budget cuts -- budget cuts begin to kick in. on the sunday, often during, 24, we will begin with the topic of health care. specifically, medicaid. is it a good idea? we want to get your thoughts on all of this. 202 is the area code. 585-3881 for the republicans. 202-585-3880 is our democratic line. you can also join us at facebook or send us an e-mail. a couple of issues dealing with health care and the elderly. a cover story, "increased -- a crisis in plain sight." and this cover story from time magazine called, "why medical billsa re killing us." and from "the new york times," -- there is the story of one of a number of republican governors -- he said ohio would reverse this decision if the government failed to cover all the cost of the expansion. here are some details for ohio -- last year the supreme court ruling that they have the a
quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year or two ago. balance sheets are repairing. yes, things seem to be heading in the right direction. but i also think that people often make the mistake of confusing the level for the growth rate. i think we need to understand that even if the economy grows at 2% or 3% this year which seems to be the optimistic but realistic forecasters out there. you are still operating in a range of high unemployment. if our economic potential grows at 3% per year and you're actual output is growing at 3% per year that means you're not going to close the gap quickly enough. one of the things maybe you can answer the question that i have not found an economist who can tell me why recent recoveries seem to be so much slower than in the past. this one is different because it is resulting from a financial shock. we don't seem to be getting the rapid upslope that you would hope in any case and that is a concern. >> i think you did answer th
and pension committee, thank you for joining us. >> discussing president obama's announcement that the u.s. will reduce troops sent to 34,000 by next year. the education week staff writer outlined by president obama, and the federal trade commission talked about a recent study that found that 5% of people who, it could affect their ability to borrow money. next, the u.s. army chief of staff talks about the future of the army. and then president obama on gun legislation and the plan to help the middle class. democratic leaders outlined their plans to avoid federal budget cuts. >>-saturday, we are in savannah at 4, georgia for live coverage of the book festival starting at 10:15 east turn on the future. a former navy psychologists on lessons i learned that combat hospital. the chief washington correspondent on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. a presidential historian, and of 4:00, and gary wills asks, why priests? live saturday on c-span to. >> he thought she was the smartest person he ever knew and he knew how much she loved him. he knew that she would tell him the truth. she wasn't
for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 354, the nays are 72. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the house will be in order. the house will be in order. would members please clear the well. for what purpose does the gentma leader, from california, seek recognition? ms. pelosi: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized, but the house is not in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house will be in order. the gentlewoman from california is recognized. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. i rise with great pride to pay tribute to a very distinguished american, a longtime member of the congressional staff, in fact a person who has served the congress for 38 years as a member of the staff. 30 of it for george miller, eight as my assistant in the leadership office, john lawrenc
," this morning headlines -- "u.s. memo on killing citizens in al qaeda." host: the story is in "the new york times." nbc news, reporting on that as well. front page of "the wall street journal," the u.s. is going to suit standard and poor's on ratings. host: that is the front page of "the wall street journal," and many of the newspapers this morning. on the senate side, "the boston globe," "the gop is finding few takers for the john kerry see. the party is not deterred -- seat. the party is not deterred." oncehis one, "senator's secret daughter dies at 87." host: that is the front page this morning of "the state newspaper." we will go to sarah in clark summit, independent caller. we are talking about president obama saying that universal background checks have the support of the majority. what do you think about this? what else do you think should be done? caller: first i have a question. i am a gun owner. hopefully i will never have to use it for anything that anyone else would have to use it for, but i do like the protection on our small farm. and we do shoot. we have taught our grandkids,
, for every 12, 2013. president obama traveled -- will travel down pennsylvania avenue tonight to the u.s. capitol building to deliver the first state of the union address of his second term at 9:00 eastern. c-span coverage begins at 8:00 tonight. we would like to hear from you this morning. how much reducing state of the union addresses matter? here are the numbers to call -- be it can also find us online. john the conversation -- -- join the conversation. the front page of "politico's website -- we will talk about lobbying later on this morning. first, let's look at the five stings it says to watch the president obama address tonight. , do you think state of the union addresses matter? that's our question for you. on facebook we have a poll where you can weigh in. the washington post says the impact of annual addresses does not intend to be long-lasting. what do you stinkpot? jim in therapy -- what do you think? jim in fairfax station. caller: no, they don't matter. it's an opportunity to look at what is said in a state of the union and move forward a year after it and assess what was p
. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. heaphy, thank you for your service as a u.s. attorney in for being here today. want to join the other members of the committee in expressing my gratitude to the family members who are here today who have lost a loved one as a result of an act of violence. i believe we owe it to you not to engage in tokenism or symbolic acts, but rather, to try the best we can to address the causes and to come up with solutions, and at the same time respect the rights of law- abiding citizens to keep and bear arms is protected by the second amendment. i believe is possible for us to do that. but i also believe it is important for us to look at the laws already on the books. there is already some discussion on this, and mr. heaphy, forgive me if i repeat it. in 2008, congress passed a provision that required that the states included in the background check database, people who were adjudicated mentally ill -- you are familiar with that law, are you, sir? >> senator, i believe that is voluntary. we strongly encourage them, but unfortunately, it is still voluntary. >> why in
government in massachusetts. nearly 30 years as a u.s. senator. the only committee that he served on from the day he became a senator, until its last day in the center of the foreign relations committee. he grew up with a father in the foreign service. it is a family calling. i will count it as a joy but as a bittersweet sadness that my service in the senate, i got to serve with him on the foreign relations committee for one week. [laughter] i am the junior senator on that committee. i sit far out on the wing on that committee. it was the first committee vote i cast was to confirm him as the new secretary. senator, you are coming to a place that believes deeply in the values that you share, as robert mentioned. president jefferson strongly believed in the connection of this wonderful exemplary nations to a world community. we have been a global leader. i always like to think about the global leadership that tries to balance military strength. secretary kerry knows the importance and limits of that spirit diplomatic strength, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example,
, as do so many others who serve. the state government in massachusetts. nearly 30 years as a u.s. senator. the only committee that he served on from the day he became a senator, until its last day in the center of the foreign relations committee.-- until his last day in tas s as senator ine foreign relations committee. he grew up with a father in the foreign service. it is a family calling. i will count it as a joy but as a bittersweet sadness that my service in the senate, i got to serve with him on the foreign relations committee for one week. [laughter] i am the junior senator on that committee. i sit far out on the wing on that committee.i was together with this chair for one week. it was the first committee vote i cast was to confirm him as the new secretary. senator, you are coming to a place that believes deeply in the values that you share, as robert mentioned. president jefferson strongly believed in the connection of this wonderful exemplary nations to a world community. we have been a global leader. i always like to think about the global leadership that tries to balance milita
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
/2 million u.s.-born children whose parents are unauthorized. these children live in fear. every year nearly 200,000 noncitizens, many with children who are u.s. citizens, are deported and torn away from their families. as families are torn apart children are forced to choose between separation from their parents or leaving the only place they have ever called home. how does america end the culture of fear among immigrant communities and help preserve families? first, we must create a pathway to citizenship that encourages not discourages legalization. second, we must address the issues of mass detention and unjust criminality of immigrant populations. third, our laws and justice system must place a premium on keeping families together. by creating flexible and equitable immigration policies that prioritize the unification and stability of immigrant families we strengthen the fabric that holds our communities together. lastly, as a former mayor, i would be remiss if i did not mention the important role our states and local governments will play in immigration reform. if undocumented immigran
, we used to call -- plinted the dollar. so in a very interesting way crane knew about the u.s. economy through the dollar, through how much he printed. and crane too was silent, rarely spoke. he was the western massachusetts leader versus the boston lead ner massachusetts politics and that was coolidge's mentor. >> how much of the crash of 1929 could be blamed on coolidge? he left in march of 1929. >> so you imagen the stock market -- we look at this where i teach. the stock market was 100 for a long time. then it went up 200, very hifmente coolidge saw a lot of recessions. that doubled. that is like our 90's. then it went to 381 that would be september 1929. coolidge didn't approve of that. he had seen a lot of recessions. he knew every -- everything in him knew that was wrong. he didn't believe it was the job of the executive to intervene. it was the order of the "wall street journal." but he didn't think the president was in charge of that. the fed was also young. he looked into it. there is a record of him looking into it. charles merrill who founded merrill lynch and he went to se
is all about. >> according to the a.t.f. in 2011, 6.2 million pistols were sold in the u.s. 2.3 million rifles, 872,000 shotguns and 573,000 revolvers. larry pratt is our guest. by the way, the national rifle association was invivetted to participate in this program and they declined. blue ridge arsenal is our base this morning in virginia for the next couple of hours. we'll be talking to employees and looking at products and services that blue ridge arsenal gun shop rage provides as we take calls with our guest larry pratt. we have a call from michigan. caller: my message and reaction to comments i heard -- i haven't heard anything as far as what has been brought forth yet. why larry, do we not see -- when a gun was purchased at a -- by a dealer, why do we not see or why we haven't heard a gun lock be issued by a federal basis or by some means of standard gun lock with the southeasterly number with that particular -- serial number with that gun. they open the trunk of a person's car or vehicle and there's a gun in the back. it is an ar, it is out of the case. you go through the formali
other system in the u.s. >> thank you. >> cook county -- >> is your microphone on? >> i thought it was. thank you. cook county pairs with many other community health centers. "we find is, when we provide access to primary care, we uncover specialty needs. one of the big problems we have as a hospital, one of our major challenges, is that these patients in the community health centers have nowhere to go to receive those services. they refer them to us. i think the community health centers are invaluable, because the offer care in the communities where people live. they are likely to be more flexible in their hours and pay scales. but then they have no where to send them. we are the safety net. it is a continuous attention we have with capacity, in meeting those needs. >> do you want to ask? got to hit your button. >> thank you. i have worked for 20 years at the unity network, two or three miles here from here. what i saw there was a population that, were it not for the health center, would be in the emergency room. there were not private providers in the neighborhood. to the extent thei
the compound, the u.s. military could have done so effectively. >> yes. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> you can watch more on their testimony on the attack on the consulate's in benghazi. next, a feral ceremony for outgoing defense secretary leon panetta. president obama and the joint chiefs of staff paid tribute to him. the ceremony included members from all of the u.s. armed forces as well as performances by the band. this is about 50 minutes. ♪ ♪ [applause] ba♪ ♪ ["yankee doodle" plays] >> ladies and gentleman, please stand for the playing of the united states national anthem. >> present arms. >> present arms. ["the star-spangled banner" plays] >> please be seated. [indiscernible] ladies and gentlemen, general dempsey. [applause] >> mr. president, secretary and mrs. panetta, ambassadors, members of congress, men and women of the armed forces of the united states, especially our wounded warriors, and we cannot forget bravo. i was hoping bravo would be out there for the inspection of t
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
business. >> for natural gas and exports but u.s. masters are worried they could be impacted. is this allowing to exports and natural gas to japan? >> i appreciate the question. i'm sure we'll have a preview for you with the prime minister. i don't want to negotiate with our important allies. i'm sure we'll have more to say about this tomorrow and friday. >> what is the president's plan to prevent the sequestration from happening? you've talked about budget cuts -- what are those cuts he's proposaling? >> you can go to white house.gov and look at the reporting done and the information we provided on the offer that the president made to the speaker of the house in december in great detail, put forward the spending cuts that of the president supported and put forth, as well as the saving from the entitlement reforms. here's to me the fundamental aspect of this. if we all agree in washington, republicans if i they live in a perfect world earn there were republicans in washington in the country, they would only cut spending and not raise revenues. democrats would only raise reve
policy has been funded by the u.s. department of education, the nih and the gates foundation among many others. his current research involves evaluating the tax credit scholarship program, the largest school voucher program in the united states. conducting a large-scale study of school accountability in florida and following children from birth through school career to study keep questions regarding early childhood poverty analysts inequality. prior to joining the faculty at northwestern in 2008, david figlio taught at the university of florida from 1998-2008, and the university of oregon from 1995-1998. help me welcome david, please. [applause] >> thank you all for coming out tonight. it is a real pleasure to be year of the university of florida. as gail mentioned, i spent 10 years on the faculty here and still am always thinking about reasons to come back here. it is fabulous to look out of the audience tonight and see not only colleagues from the university but friends from the community who i grew to know and love over the years. so, it is especially wonderful to be back here in gai
on rules in the u.s. and its. there were four democrats, for republicans. it was a diverse group of senators including senator mccain, senator kyl, senator pryor, senator schumer. it was a group -- senator levin was our leader on the democratic side. we came up with reforms that i think will help. the cannot filibuster bringing a bill to the board. rather now where the minority cannot vote against cloture because they are doing it on a procedural basis. the bill will now be before us. it will get started in debate and voting on amendments before we have to worry about whether we need 60 votes for the threshold. secondly, there is a limit on how you can filibuster. we can bring the president's judicial nominees up in a much quicker way. there, you have eliminated two of the potentials on going to conference. getting into conference is particularly important in going to this congress. the most significant reform, we have dramatically reduced the power of an individual senator. if you are going to object, you need to do it on the floor of the u.s. senate. you can no longer be in you
," which kind of bothers me. i am a state senator from the state of maine.[applause] i was in the u.s. capitol and this is new stuff, feeling really great, had my suit on. i went into a restaurant and i had one of these electric things that you draw your hands with.-- dry your hands with. somebody had written on it, "press here for a message from senator king." [laughter] the bad news is, it was in harry reid's handwriting. [laughter] listen, the message is really simple. we have got to start talking to each other, solving problems, we have got to get rid of the ideology and you have got to be fired up to make it happen. the forces of division are fired up. the forces that want to pull us apart and put us into categories are fired up. there has to be support for people who want to solve problems, who want to tell the truth, who want to work a five- day week, who want to do the things that we need to do to get this country going. it is what is on the minds of the public. i was the only candidate in the country where people had a real choice. if you stop and think about it, your choices
are being held across the u.s. today. -- forward on climate rally. >> give me some music. come on. oh, yeah. let's go. come on. we say no, you say keystone. no. keystone. no. keystone. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. no keystone pipeline. come on. no keystone pipeline. come on. no keystone pipeline. >> oh, yeah. make some noise! "s.o.s." by sting] >> thank year, thank you, thank you. it's a lot will warm. they say where we are right now is at least 30,000 strong. let me say this as we get started. right here, not too far away of the lincoln memorial, dr. king -- 50 years ago -- yes. august 20th, 1963, they marched for jobs and freedom. they marched for equality. they marched so we could come together as black-and-white, brown, yellow, red, male, female, straight, gave we could all come together account as united. united against what appe? this rally it 50 years later is as important of not more important than the rally them. while they were fighting for quality, we're fighting for existence. so that in 2063, but years from now, they will look back door and
documentation from the u.s. army or philippine government attesting their service. simply put, these men fought so the allies could defeet the japanese in the pacific. if they could show they fought, let's fulfill their promise to them so they could live out their years knowing the united states has officially recognized their service. i have met with them many times in las vegas. all they want is to be recognized. it's not about the money to them. they want to know that their service was appreciated, that their sacrifices did not go unnoticed. as i attended the funeral last week, no flag draped his casket. no honor guard was present. and there was no playing of taps. there was no official recognition of his dedicated military service. and that, mr. speaker, was wrong. i'd like to thank my friends and brother veterans for their service to our country, their passion and dedication to this cause will be missed. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in fighting to ensure these honorable world war ii veterans are appropriately recognized and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro
or so. we're taking your calls to hear your thoughts. we're looking at a shot of the u.s. capitol building. we're following tweets and looking at the #sotu. howard on the democrats line. caller: my thoughts is like the republicans have always done what they always done. they always try to put us into the whole concept is like, you know, it is the middle class. in this country that we have forgotten there is three different classes of people. they try to make us believe there is the rich, the middle class, and then that was it. but there is still -- it is the middle class then there is the poor. those ones who make below the minimum wage freeway for state to state that -- from state to state. my concept is with them is, any time you can talk to the president -- the president and you have not come to a conclusion with him and agree with him on anything to give him any kind of concept is two things. it is like this. why is it when you become an average citizen to take office -- as you get into an office where a senate or congressman where that next thing we know that you are making m
more earlier. 15 months ago the secretary sent a letter to the u.s. congress saying that the effects of sequestration would be devastating. that was october 2011. after that we testified in august and again in september, we listed every single major item we're talking about. we said that there would be cutbacks in readiness and a unit buys would go down with unit costs growing up. what we did not do was detailed budget planning. i do not regret that. if we did it 60 months ago, we would have been wrong. we would not know that congress would have changed the size and the date and we would not have incurred the degradation route. we sounded the alarm in every way that we could. >> what kind of contract are you having with the white house? -- contact are you having with the white house? are you trying to offer up any solutions? sequestration confined to savings hear, hear, and here? what other things would you be doing right now? >> talking to my wife. [laughter] let the answer the first question. i do not think i am of best person that answer. we were very interested in a closely monit
to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the message from the secretary of the senate on february 27, 2013, at 1:57 p.m. . appointments, joint committee on taxation, with best wished, i am, signed, sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california, ms. speier, for 30 minutes. ms. speier: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to compliment the gentleman from wisconsin and the freshmen members who participated in the last hour for a job well done in underscoring what the sequester means to americans across the country. i'm going to shift gears now and i'm joined by my good colleague from virginia, congressman moran, and we're going to talk about gun violence. you know, those of us who have been victims of gun violence see horrific pictures in our minds over and over again. mine was over 30 years ago but i am still haunted by visuals of that day. my leg being blown up and my arm being blown up. and really thinking
said, an abrupt spending sequester could cause a u.s. recession. do you recommend an austerity path at this point? what should we be doing that's different than the european austerity experiment that appears to have ended so badly for them? >> we have not studied each of the european countries and there are many factors that affect their economic performance but the recessions and economic crackses that have occurred in -- contractions that have occurred are consistent with the analysis we have been offering to the congress for many years now that raising taxes and cutting spending at a time when the economy is already weak and the federal reserve is limited in its further options to support the economy, will tend to reduce output and jobs relative to what would occur if fiscal policy were not tightened in those ways. >> you are predicting a more than 1% difference in g.d.p. as a result of that if we don't manage the sequester properly, correct? >> without any of the fiscal tightening it, the sequester itself represents about six-tenths of 1% of g.d.p. growth and 750,000 jobs by the
, 2.6 million pistols were sold in the u.s., 2.3 million rifles. 862,000 shotguns. 573,000 revolvers. larry pratt is our guest, executive director of gun owners of america. the national rifle association was also invited to participate in this program and they have declined. blue ridge arsenal is our base this morning in chantilly, virginia for the next couple of hours. we will be talking with employees and looking at some of the products and services the blue ridge arsenal gunshot and range provides as we take calls with our guest larry pratt. dave is in michigan. caller: hello, my message in reaction to many things is i really have not heard anything as far as what has been brought forth yeah -- why do we not see when a gun is purchase, whether it is a straw purchase, whether it is dealer, why do we not see -- why have we not all heard about a gun lock be issued by a federal base or by some needs of stamping a gun lock with the serial number with that particular gun, that coordinates with that gun? i have seen in alaska, opening up the trunk of a person's vehicle, if there is a gun
is all about. host: according to the atf, in 2011, 2.6 million pistols were sold in the u.s., 2.3 million rifles. 862,000 shotguns. 573,000 revolvers. larry pratt is our guest, executive director of gun owners of america. the national rifle association was also invited to participate in this program and they have declined. blue ridge arsenal is our base this morning in chantilly, virginia for the next couple of hours. we will be talking with employees and looking at some of the products and services the blue ridge arsenal gunshot and range provides as we take calls with our guest larry pratt. dave is in michigan. caller: hello, my message in reaction to many things is i really have not heard anything as far as what has been brought forth yeah -- why do we not see when a gun is purchase, whether it is a straw purchase, whether it is dealer, why do we not see -- why have we not all heard about a gun lock be issued by a federal base or by some needs of stamping a gun lock with the serial number with that particular gun, that coordinates with that gun? i have seen in alaska, opening up the tr
of america put out a piece, talking about the u.s. celebrating president's day. it first became a federal holiday in 1879 to celebrate the february 22nd birthday of george washington, the first u.s. president. joe in maryland, democrat, hi. caller: my favorit would have to have been bill clinton. there are so many to choose from. i was very young. it was in high school at the time. he put into place a lot of laws that allow for people like me to go to college. beyond that, he was just incredibly involved in science necessarily see a lot of a a lot of presidents do now. host: from oklahoma, an independent caller. caller: my favorite president has to be lyndon johnson. look what he did for civil rights not only for americans but for everybody in this country. he fought through the garage of our southern states, and he got it through. -- fought through the brage of our southern states. lyndon johnson said, "when i sign these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for
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